DEMOCRACY, THE DISAPPEARANCE OF INDIVIDUAL FREEDOM, AND THE DEMISE OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC


America’s founding fathers and forefathers feared and mistrusted government and considered it to be a necessary evil. They equated the capacity of government for evil with the capacity of and propensity for evil that is innate in people, non-Christians and Christians (Rom. 3:10; 6:15, 16), who are involved in and with government. This explains why they devised a rule of written law for Americans, thereby making us a Constitutional Republic. Thomas Jefferson expressed the sentiment of all the founders when he wrote: “The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first.”


Commensurate with the fear and mistrust of the founders for government in general was their fear and mistrust of democracy in particular. Famed historians, Charles and Mary Beard wrote: “the founders of the Republic in general, whether Federalist or Republican, they feared democracy more than they feared original sin.” These sentiments were shared by almost universally by all our early leaders.


John Winthrop (1588-1649) perhaps the most famous of all the early colonial governors, said “Democracy is the meanest and worst of all forms of government.” John Witherspoon (1723-1794) said, “Pure democracy cannot subsist long nor be carried far into the departments of state; it is very subject to caprice and the madness of popular rage.” John Adams wrote, “Remember, democracy never lasts long. It soon wastes, destroys and murders itself. There never was a democracy yet that didn’t commit suicide.” Alexander Hamilton referred to “Our real disease—which is democracy.” Benjamin Rush (1745-1813) insisted that, “A simple democracy is one of our greatest evils.” Fisher Ames (1758-1808) wrote, “The known propensity of a democracy is to licentiousness which the ambitious call, and the ignorant believe, to be liberty.” Page after page of such quotations can be cited. This fear and mistrust was well-founded, being rooted in ancient wisdom and experience. Nearly 2200 years earlier Plato had written, “Democracy leads to anarchy, which is mob rule.” And 550 years later, Seneca would write, “Democracy is more cruel than wars or tyrants.”


In one of the earlier scenes of the movie, The Patriot, as colonial leaders are debating whether or not to go to war with England, one of them says, “Our rights are being threatened by a tyrant 3,000 miles away.” To this, another present asks, “Would you tell me please … why I should trade one tyrant 3,000 miles away for 3,000 tyrants one mile away?” This is classic and ever so pertinent to the point being made above about the mistrust we should have of government precisely because of the mistrust we should have of men in government because of their sinful nature. It has been often said, “The best of men are men at best.” These are words of wisdom and warning the veracity of which has been validated throughout history; words that cannot be spoken or heeded enough.


Democracy, throughout history has been a tool of tyrants; a tool whereby bad men merchandise on the weak-mindedness of people in order to bring out the worst that is in them, which eventuates in whole populations being enslaved to totalitarian government and the worst conditions into which it is possible for men and women to be brought. Karl Marx wrote, “Democracy is the road to socialism,” and Vladimir Lenin echoed this when he said, “Democracy is indispensible to socialism.” These men understood perfectly well how democracy works, as did the socialist communist leaders responsible for the non-combatant deaths, the "murder by government," of over 100 million of their own people during the twentieth century alone. And, make no mistake about it, the movers and shakers in and behind America's Democratic Party leadership today also understand very well how democracy works — how "indispensable it is to socialism" (and ultimately to a totalitarian state) democracy is.


Democracy is like poison in a hospital IV drip that has been slowly, steadily, introduced into America’s bloodstream via our institutions of government, education and media; killing liberty drip by drip. Think about all this all this when you remember how often you have heard, and how often you hear America referred to as a “Democracy” by people who have surely been educated enough to know better. These are those who are either ignorantly irresponsible and careless or motivated in this work of disinformation by things that are sinister and treasonous. Democracy has brought us to the place now of which the second President of our Republic warned when he wrote:


“Democracy will soon degenerate into an anarchy; such an anarchy that every man will do what is right in his own eyes and no man’s life or property or reputation or liberty will be secure, and every one of these will soon mould into a system of subordination of all the moral virtues and intellectual abilities, all the powers of wealth, beauty, wit, and science, to the wanton pleasures, the capricious will, and the execrable cruelty of one or a very few.”—John Adams


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